Tuesday, October 17, 2017

MAINTENANCE TIPS

PASCHALL TRUCK LINES
MAINTENANCE TIPS
 
 
 
*         Check oil daily.

*         If adding oil use Chevron Delo XLE 10w30 oil.

*         All trucks use Chevron Delo ELC nitrate free coolant.

*         PM Service may be performed at West Memphis AR or Murray KY.

*         Check tire pressure frequently.

*         110 psi in the steer tires.

*         100 psi in the drive & trailer tires.

*         Keep air intake for Espar heater clear of debris. Blocking this intake will cause the heater to shut down and potentially cause unnecessary service costs. This intake is located under the bunk.

*         We have 2 different types of APU's in our fleet. You will be given a handout when assigned a truck that explains the operation of the specific APU that is in the truck you are being assigned.

*         It is important to perform a good pre-trip inspection of the tractor and trailer. About 80% of all maintenance write-ups fall in the categories of brakes/lights/tires (chafing airlines, air leaks, worn/cracked brakes, worn/flat tires, lights out, etc.). If you find any defects call our breakdown department so we can get it addressed before you start your trip.

*         Wait to have routine maintenance and/or driver write-ups fixed until at our terminals if at all possible.
 
 
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Tuesday, September 19, 2017

2017 President & CEO Annoucement


               

To all PTL Employees,

After forty-four years serving as President and CEO of Paschall Truck Lines, Tony Waller has announced his retirement effective September 25, 2017. Although he will be leaving the day-to-day operations of the company, he will continue to serve as Chairman of the Board of Directors. Please join us in thanking Mr. Waller for all his years of service and leadership of the company in his capacity as CEO.

PTL is pleased to announce that David Gibbs of Decatur, IL (pictured below) will be assuming Mr. Waller's duties as President and CEO effective September 25th.  Dave has over 35 years of leadership experience at some of the largest and best run trucking companies in the industry. Please join us in welcoming Dave to the PTL family.




Below is a letter to all PTL Employees from Mr. Waller.
                

3443 Highway 641 South - P.O. Box 1080 - Murray - Kentucky 42071-0018

Telephone: 270-753-1717 


September 14, 2017



From:   Randall A. Waller, Sr., President & CEO

To:       Drivers, Staff and Management of Paschall Truck Lines, Inc.


Paschall Truck Lines was established in 1937; this year, 2017, is our 80th anniversary.  When I purchased the company from L.W. Paschall in 1973, I hoped to continue a successful business that would allow the employees to provide for their families and for me to provide for mine.  At that time I never dreamed that the company would grow from a handful of trucks and employees to over 1300 tractors, 3000 trailers and 1700 employees. 

I also never dreamed that I would one day be able to hand over the keys of ownership to the employees themselves. As you know, we were able to do that four years ago when I sold all of the company stock to the PTL Employee Stock Ownership Plan.  This transaction established the employees as the beneficial owners of Paschall Truck Lines and guaranteed a company presence in Murray, Kentucky for many years to come.  Although I have continued my duties as President and Chief Executive Officer in the intervening years, I believe that the time has come for me to retire from those duties.

While there is never a perfect time to step away, I believe that current and upcoming economic conditions will allow the company to continue to thrive.  I want to thank all of the employees, vendors, and customers who have helped make the company such a success over the last forty-four years and to ask for their continued service and patronage to the company in the future.

Last December, the PTL Board of Directors established a search committee to identify and hire the person who would become the next President and CEO of Paschall Truck Lines.  After an exhaustive search, the board has hired David (Dave) Gibbs currently of Decatur, Illinois.  David has over 35 years of management and operational experience at some of the best run trucking companies in the industry.  I am confident that he is the right person to lead the company into the coming years.

While I am retiring from my duties as President and CEO effective September 25, 2017, I will remain engaged with the company as Chairman of the Board of directors.  It is in that capacity that I ask everyone to give Dave your full support to help ensure the continued success of PTL.  Once again, thank you for your support over the last forty-four years, and may God bless the PTL Family with a bright and prosperous future.






Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Becoming a trainer with Paschall Truck Lines



Our Trainers have a tremendous impact on new drivers. Drivers have a tough job and inexperienced trainees have a lot to learn before they are ready to be on their own. You, as an experienced driver, know this is a complex lifestyle in which new drivers need help learning to adapt to. You know how to navigate the roads safely, manage time, and take care of items at home while on the road. This is not an easy lifestyle, nor is it glamorous. You can help a new driver the same way that your Trainer helped you to learn a tough new job and give back to PTL and the industry by training better, safer drivers. As Employee-Owners, we all have a stake in the Company. Becoming a trainer is a way to ensure our future success by passing your knowledge along to the next generation of drivers. 


  • You get paid your normal rate for all dispatched miles the truck moves.
  • After the trainee has driven 5,000 miles and passes their upgrade test you will receive $100..
  •  After the trainee has run 30,000 miles as a team with another trainee you get $400!
  • As an Employee-Owner you can ensure our future success by training our new drivers to drive a fine line, correctly and safely.

If you are interested in becoming a Trainer, contact your fleet manager to begin the qualification process
 
 
 
 
 
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Thursday, June 1, 2017

Transflo Mobile +

TRANSFLO Mobile+ is an on-the-go solution that allows drivers to scan and submit paperwork electronically to carriers.
Compatible with iPhones and Androids
Easy for drivers and carriers to use
Free to download
Provides a confirmation number and email after each submission
Review documents online for 14 days at www.transfloexpress.com
To register you will need to enter our Recipient ID: PASC
* Be sure to enter a valid email address when registering. You will need to go to your email account and click on a link to activate service, after you register on your phone
Checklist for the Best Images:
Be sure to take a picture of the cover sheet first, that is what keeps everything together!
Place document on a flat, dark or contrasting non-glare surface.
Take picture in a bright, well lit environment.
If the document is on glossy paper, it may be better to turn flash off.
Hold phone approximately 14 inches away and be sure to fill the screen with the entire document.
Good picture focus is required. To get good focus, keep the phone steady then wait for the blue autofocus square to show then take the picture. You can also tap the screen to trigger the auto-focus.
If you are in-cab turn off your engine to eliminate vibration and keep hands steady.
User Guide is available on the app by clicking the question mark in the upper right hand corner, or by visiting: www.transflomobile.com/user-guide.
Support line: 813.386.2327 • Support email: support@transflo.com
 
you CAN now see your preplans and payroll previews!
Drivers, you can now see your preplans and Tuesday payroll previews on your Transflo Mobile+ app. This is handy when are on home time or away from your truck. When your preplans and payroll preview are sent you will receive them on your mobile phone as well as your Qualcomm. If you currently have the Transflo + app: From your home screen on Transflo Mobile+, click on profile/settings, choose recipients then PASC, click edit in top right corner then delete driver id, reenter it and click save. Contact Steve Ingersoll, Ext. 712, or Mason Lusk, Ext. 714, if you have questions.
 
 
 
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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

CVTA Conference


 
This past week, Paul Rasmussen, VP of Recruiting, Chelsea Wadkins, Recruiting Manager, and Mike Rojas, Student Development Recruiter, were able to attend the CVTA Spring Conference in New Orleans. Commercial Vehicle Training Association, also known as CVTA, was founded in 1996. It is made up of 200 training providers, 20 motor carriers, along with advertising agencies, financial institutions, insurance companies, and educational resources. This association helps provide different programs to continue to improve training programs throughout the trucking industry. CVTA updates members with new laws and regulations and give insight into what the future could be for the trucking industry. According to the CVTA, their school members have a 90% higher placement rate. This means more student drivers who attend a CDL Training School that is affiliated with CVTA have a better chance at finding a trucking career faster.  Their mission focuses on excellence in training, developing transportation safety, and how to enhance driver professionalism.

Some of the many topics discussed at the conference include: Recruiting Millennial Drivers, looking into the Future, Fundamentals & Pitfalls of Business Expansion, and Financial Industry Best Practices.   Each topic related to each member involved, and all were able to talk openly about their personal experiences and methods for enhancement during round table meetings.  By attending the CVTA conference, attendees were able to not only learn more about each topic, but understand other’s expertise and opinions on critical issues facing the industry.

During the conference, PTL was able to sponsor a break in-between sessions.  VP of Recruiting Paul Rasmussen also ran for CVTA Board of Directors for the open carrier spot, and won that nomination. Now, being a part of the Board of Directors, Paul will be able to continue to help CVTA achieve their mission and take part in actions to help manage the trucking industry’s reputation.  We would like to congratulate Paul on this accomplishment. 
 
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Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Five Things You NEED TO Know About Roadside Inspections

Five Things You NEED TO Know About Roadside Inspections
By Larry Kahaner from Fleetowner.com
 
Andy Blair was a municipal police officer for 26 years and received DOT training through the Pennsylvania State Police. He inspected trucks for his last 11 years on the force. Blair is DOT-certified in cargo, tank and hazmat, and he also was a weighmaster. Now retired from law enforcement, he operates DOT Checkups, a York, Pennsylvania company that fleets hire to inspect their trucks before they hit the road. He conducts 300 to 400 inspections of all levels every year.
Here's what he wants drivers and managers to know about roadside inspections.
A tidy cab can often mean 'move along.' "I can't inspect every truck that comes my way so I have to use my discretion and experience. Certainly, I look at your BASIC scores, and maybe you've got a light out – that's a no-brainer -  but beyond that  I look inside the truck.  I realize that some guys are on the road quite a bit.  I get that. And some of them, to a degree, live in their truck or certainly spend a fair amount of time in it.  But when I see what looks like a pigsty on the inside of the truck, my thoughts are 'that’s how this guy is going to  maintain his truck,' assuming he’s the operator.  Even if he’s not, it may be an indication of how well he keeps after the company to fix things.  I'm not talking a couple items of trash or a McDonald’s bag laying around. We’re not expecting that Mr. Clean just came by and visited you. I'm talking about something that looks bad and smells bad. We’re talking some heavy disarray, not just something thrown in a corner. So, right away I'm thinking, 'Okay, I get it. This guy really doesn’t keep after things too well.' The chances of me finding something wrong with the truck are probably better."
Make your documents easy for me to inspect.  "I've stopped you, I've pulled you in, and I've made a quick assessment of what you truck looks like. I'm now asking for your documents. If you’re one of those guys that just can’t find your stuff, or you’re handing me papers from 2009,  2010 and 2011, then you know what? Pull it in; you’re going to be here for a while. Probably the best presentations that I see are when the driver takes the time to put the documents in something like a ring binder - medical card, registration, all that. It makes it easier to look through.  If it’s a rainy day, I don’t have to worry about dropping them and the wind blowing it away. It just keeps it neater and cleaner, and it looks good. If so, you may be on your way. I stopped a lot of trucks and I didn’t inspect every one of them. If a guy looked like his truck was in good shape and his documents looked good, too, then chances of me going further were diminished."
Attitude counts. "It’s totally my discretion as an officer who I pick to inspect. Don't do or say anything to volunteer yourself [for an inspection] by doing dumb stuff. I don't want to hear: 'What’d ya stop me for? I didn’t do anything wrong.' If you can do anything to mitigate the chances or likelihood of being held up and inspected, it’s probably worth your time to do that, even if you don’t feel like it. At this point, I've looked in your cab, checked your documents, and seen how you handle yourself and how you answer my questions. Right now, I'm going to make my decision: throw you back in the pond or reel you in, which brings us to the next item..."
I don't have a quota for citations, but I have a quota for inspections. "Even if you look good, I still may inspect your truck, because I need to get some inspections done. There are never any requirements to write a ticket, but there are requirements to do a minimum number of inspections [per quarter] to keep my credentials current. There are times that you may have a great truck and you have all your documents and the inspector still says, “We’re doing a level one.” That's just how it goes."
If you're chosen for inspection, grit your teeth and go through it with some grace. If you’ve got a good truck, you might get an 'atta-boy' as I like to call it. The more you cooperate with the officer, the better you’ll get through the inspection, because the officer has the full discretion to write, or not to write, and to cite you or cite the company. It's not etched in stone, but usually the equipment stuff I would write to the company. The pre-trip stuff, I would cite to the driver.  Once I've decided that we’re going through with an inspection, I ask 'is there anything wrong with your truck today that you know from your pre-trip inspection?'  If the answer is 'no, I'll say, 'Good for you. I'm going to do your pre-trip again.' I've had owner-operators who, when I asked for their fire extinguisher and triangles, didn’t know where they were. Some triangles would be missing or the fire extinguishers would be covered with dirt and discharged. On the other hand, every driver that told me right up front, “I did my pre-trip today and I found this and this wrong," I've never written a citation.  I might write the company but I didn’t write the driver.  I understand that between the terminal and the inspection area a light can go out, and so I don’t get all that excited. But you can’t tell me that you left the terminal 80 miles ago and that your tire went completely smooth in 80 miles."
In summary, Blair says: "A lot of this is common sense. If the truck looks half decent, if the driver is prepared, if they have their documents, if they have everything ready to go, and they’re decent about it, have a good attitude - even if they’re gritting their teeth - they reduce the likelihood and chances of the officer going further. I can’t say it prohibits it, but you have a better chance of not being held up and getting on your way faster."
 
 
WHAT INSPECTORS ARE LOOKING FOR
Brakes: Check for missing, non-functioning, loose, contaminated or cracked parts on the brake system; Check for “S” cam flip-over; Be alert for audible air leaks around brake components and lines; Check that the slack adjusters are the same length (from center of “S” cam to center of clevis pin), and that the air chambers on each axle are the same size. Check brake adjustment; Ensure the air system maintains air pressure between 90 and 100 psi; Measure pushrod travel; Inspect required brake system warning devices, such as ABS malfunction lamps and low air pressure warning devices; Inspect tractor protection system, including the bleedback system on the trailer.
Coupling Devices: Safety Devices-Full Trailers/Converter Dolly(s): Check the safety devices (chains/wire rope) for sufficient number, missing components, improper repairs, and devices that are incapable of secure attachment. On the Lower Fifth Wheel check for unsecured mounting to the frame or any missing or damaged parts; or any visible space between the upper and lower fifth wheel plates. Verify that the locking jaws are around the shank and not the head of the kingpin and that the release lever is seated properly and that the safety latch is engaged. Check the Upper Fifth Wheel for any damage to the weight bearing plate (and its supports) such as cracks, loose or missing bolts on the trailer. On the Sliding Fifth Wheel check for proper engagement of locking mechanism (teeth fully engaged on rail); also check for worn or missing parts, ensure that the position does not allow the tractor frame rails to contact the landing gear during turns. Check for damaged or missing fore and aft stops.
Fuel and Exhaust Systems: Check your fuel tanks for the following conditions: Loose mounting, leaks, or other conditions; loose or missing caps; and signs of leaking fuel below the tanks. For exhaust systems, check the following: Unsecured mounting; leaks beneath the cab; exhaust system components in contact with electrical wiring or brake lines and hoses; and excessive carbon deposits around seams and clamps.
Frame, Van and Open-Top Trailers: Inspect for corrosion fatigue, cross member(s) cracked, loose or missing, cracks in frame, missing or defective body parts. Look at the condition of the hoses, check suspension of air hoses of vehicle with sliding tandems. On the frame and frame assembly check for cracks, bends, sagging, loose fasteners or any defect that may lead to the collapse of the frame; corrosion, fatigue, cross members cracked or missing, cracks in frame, missing or defective body parts. Inspect all axle(s). Inspect for non-manufactured holes (i.e. rust holes, holes created by rubbing or friction, etc.), for broken springs in the spring brake housing section of the parking brake. For vans and open-top trailer bodies, look at the upper rail and check roof bows and side posts for buckling, cracks, or ineffective fasteners. On the lower rail, check for breaks accompanied by sagging floor, rail, or cross members; or broken with loose or missing fasteners at side post adjacent to the crack.
Lighting: Inspect all required lamps for proper color, operation, mounting and visibility.
Securement of Cargo: Make sure you are carrying a safe load. Check tail board security. Verify end gates are secured in stake pockets. Check both sides of the trailer to ensure cargo is protected from shifting or falling. Verify that rear doors are securely closed. Where load is visible, check for proper blocking and bracing. It may be necessary to examine inside of trailer to assure that large objects are properly secured. Check cargo securement devices for proper number, size and condition. Check tie down anchor points for deformation and cracking.
Steering: Check the steering lash by first turning the steering wheel in one direction until the tires begin to pivot. Then, place a mark on the steering wheel at a fixed reference point and then turn the wheel in the opposite direction until the tires again start to move. Mark the steering wheel at the same fixed reference point and measure the distance between the two marks. The amount of allowable lash varies with the diameter of the steering wheel.
Suspension: Inspect the suspension for: Indications of misaligned, shifted, cracked or missing springs; loosened shackles; missing bolts; unsecured spring hangars; and cracked or loose U-bolts. Also, check any unsecured axle positioning parts and for signs of axle misalignment. On the front axle, check for cracks, welds and obvious misalignment.
Tires, Wheels, Rims and Hubs: Check tires for proper inflation, cuts and bulges, regrooved tires on steering axle, tread wear and major tread groove depth. Inspect sidewalls for defects, improper repairs, exposed fabric or cord, contact with any part of the vehicle, and tire markings excluding it from use on a steering axle. Inspect wheels and rims for cracks, unseated locking rings, and broken or missing lugs, studs or clamps. Also check for rims that are cracked or bent, have loose or damaged lug nuts and elongated stud holes, have cracks across spokes or in the web area, and have evidence of slippage in the clamp areas. Check the hubs for lubricant leaks, missing caps or plugs, misalignment and and positioning, and damaged, worn or missing parts.
 
 
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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

FAQ Hours of Service 34-Hour Restart

FAQ HOURS OF SERVICE 34-HOUR RESTART
 
The rule says a driver can only have one restart in every 7-day (168-hour) period. When does the 7-day/168-hour clock
start?
The rule requires that a driver not start their next restart break until 168 hours have passed since the start of the driver’s last restart break. So, if a driver started their last restart at 8 pm on Friday night, the earliest the driver could start their next restart break would be 8 pm the following Friday.
 
Does this new rule mean that a driver cannot be given 34 hours or more off more than once per week?
No. Drivers can have off all the time they and their companies agree to. The only issue is that a driver who gets two or more breaks in a 7-day period that qualify as restarts must indicate which one (if any) is to be considered the restart. 
 
Since the restart can only be taken once per week (every 168 hours), what happens if I run out of hours 5 days after my
last restart? 
You can start driving again as soon as you have hours available under the 70 hour limit based on your recap or you get a 34-hour restart once you wait more than 168 hours from the start of your last restart.
 
Is a restart going to be required when a driver runs out of hours?
No, a driver taking a restart after running out of hours has never been required. If a driver runs out of hours today he can do a 34-hour restart or he can run on the hours he picks up off his 70 hour recap at midnight. There is no requirement that a driver take a restart at any time. If the driver has hours available under his recap, the driver can continue to drive.
 
Does the restart have to be taken at the driver’s home or home terminal to be considered a valid restart?
No, it does not. There has been some confusion on this as the rules require that the restart be taken in the driver’s home terminal time. What this means is the restart period must be based on the driver’s log time and not local time. Since all PTL drivers are based out of Murray KY they must log on Central Standard Time. All of the entries on your logs should be shown in Central time including your 34-hour restart. 
 
 
 
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