Tuesday, April 18, 2017

FAQ Hours of Service 34-Hour Restart

FAQ HOURS OF SERVICE 34-HOUR RESTART
 
The rule says a driver can only have one restart in every 7-day (168-hour) period. When does the 7-day/168-hour clock
start?
The rule requires that a driver not start their next restart break until 168 hours have passed since the start of the driver’s last restart break. So, if a driver started their last restart at 8 pm on Friday night, the earliest the driver could start their next restart break would be 8 pm the following Friday.
 
Does this new rule mean that a driver cannot be given 34 hours or more off more than once per week?
No. Drivers can have off all the time they and their companies agree to. The only issue is that a driver who gets two or more breaks in a 7-day period that qualify as restarts must indicate which one (if any) is to be considered the restart. 
 
Since the restart can only be taken once per week (every 168 hours), what happens if I run out of hours 5 days after my
last restart? 
You can start driving again as soon as you have hours available under the 70 hour limit based on your recap or you get a 34-hour restart once you wait more than 168 hours from the start of your last restart.
 
Is a restart going to be required when a driver runs out of hours?
No, a driver taking a restart after running out of hours has never been required. If a driver runs out of hours today he can do a 34-hour restart or he can run on the hours he picks up off his 70 hour recap at midnight. There is no requirement that a driver take a restart at any time. If the driver has hours available under his recap, the driver can continue to drive.
 
Does the restart have to be taken at the driver’s home or home terminal to be considered a valid restart?
No, it does not. There has been some confusion on this as the rules require that the restart be taken in the driver’s home terminal time. What this means is the restart period must be based on the driver’s log time and not local time. Since all PTL drivers are based out of Murray KY they must log on Central Standard Time. All of the entries on your logs should be shown in Central time including your 34-hour restart. 
 
 
 
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Monday, April 17, 2017

A Former DOT Inspector Tells All

A Former DOT Inspector Tells All

Five Things You Don't Know About Roadside Inspections

By Larry Kahaner from Fleetowner.com



Andy Blair was a municipal police officer for 26 years and received DOT training through the Pennsylvania State Police. He inspected trucks for his last 11 years on the force. Blair is DOT-certified in cargo, tank and hazmat, and he also was a weighmaster. Now retired from law enforcement, he operates DOT Checkups, a York, Pennsylvania company that fleets hire to inspect their trucks before they hit the road. He conducts 300 to 400 inspections of all levels every year.

Here's what he wants drivers and managers to know about roadside inspections.

*         A tidy cab can often mean 'move along.' "I can't inspect every truck that comes my way so I have to use my discretion and experience. Certainly, I look at your BASIC scores, and maybe you've got a light out - that's a no-brainer -  but beyond that  I look inside the truck.  I realize that some guys are on the road quite a bit.  I get that. And some of them, to a degree, live in their truck or certainly spend a fair amount of time in it.  But when I see what looks like a pigsty on the inside of the truck, my thoughts are 'that's how this guy is going to  maintain his truck,' assuming he's the operator.  Even if he's not, it may be an indication of how well he keeps after the company to fix things.  I'm not talking a couple items of trash or a McDonald's bag laying around. We're not expecting that Mr. Clean just came by and visited you. I'm talking about something that looks bad and smells bad. We're talking some heavy disarray, not just something thrown in a corner. So, right away I'm thinking, 'Okay, I get it. This guy really doesn't keep after things too well.' The chances of me finding something wrong with the truck are probably better."

*         Make your documents easy for me to inspect.  "I've stopped you, I've pulled you in, and I've made a quick assessment of what you truck looks like. I'm now asking for your documents. If you're one of those guys that just can't find your stuff, or you're handing me papers from 2009,  2010 and 2011, then you know what? Pull it in; you're going to be here for a while. Probably the best presentations that I see are when the driver takes the time to put the documents in something like a ring binder - medical card, registration, all that. It makes it easier to look through.  If it's a rainy day, I don't have to worry about dropping them and the wind blowing it away. It just keeps it neater and cleaner, and it looks good. If so, you may be on your way. I stopped a lot of trucks and I didn't inspect every one of them. If a guy looked like his truck was in good shape and his documents looked good, too, then chances of me going further were diminished."

*         Attitude counts. "It's totally my discretion as an officer who I pick to inspect. Don't do or say anything to volunteer yourself [for an inspection] by doing dumb stuff. I don't want to hear: 'What'd ya stop me for? I didn't do anything wrong.' If you can do anything to mitigate the chances or likelihood of being held up and inspected, it's probably worth your time to do that, even if you don't feel like it. At this point, I've looked in your cab, checked your documents, and seen how you handle yourself and how you answer my questions. Right now, I'm going to make my decision: throw you back in the pond or reel you in, which brings us to the next item..."

*         I don't have a quota for citations, but I have a quota for inspections. "Even if you look good, I still may inspect your truck, because I need to get some inspections done. There are never any requirements to write a ticket, but there are requirements to do a minimum number of inspections [per quarter] to keep my credentials current. There are times that you may have a great truck and you have all your documents and the inspector still says, "We're doing a level one." That's just how it goes."

*         If you're chosen for inspection, grit your teeth and go through it with some grace. If you've got a good truck, you might get an 'atta-boy' as I like to call it. The more you cooperate with the officer, the better you'll get through the inspection, because the officer has the full discretion to write, or not to write, and to cite you or cite the company. It's not etched in stone, but usually the equipment stuff I would write to the company. The pre-trip stuff, I would cite to the driver.  Once I've decided that we're going through with an inspection, I ask 'is there anything wrong with your truck today that you know from your pre-trip inspection?'  If the answer is 'no, I'll say, 'Good for you. I'm going to do your pre-trip again.' I've had owner-operators who, when I asked for their fire extinguisher and triangles, didn't know where they were. Some triangles would be missing or the fire extinguishers would be covered with dirt and discharged. On the other hand, every driver that told me right up front, "I did my pre-trip today and I found this and this wrong," I've never written a citation.  I might write the company but I didn't write the driver.  I understand that between the terminal and the inspection area a light can go out, and so I don't get all that excited. But you can't tell me that you left the terminal 80 miles ago and that your tire went completely smooth in 80 miles."

In summary, Blair says: "A lot of this is common sense. If the truck looks half decent, if the driver is prepared, if they have their documents, if they have everything ready to go, and they're decent about it, have a good attitude - even if they're gritting their teeth - they reduce the likelihood and chances of the officer going further. I can't say it prohibits it, but you have a better chance of not being held up and getting on your way faster."



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Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Speaking of Maintenance

DRIVERS AND MAINTENANCE

I know a lot of our drivers personally and they know me. They all know that I am not a truck driver. That doesn't mean that I don't understand some of the frustrations of spending life on the road. I invest a lot of time and effort in understanding the problems drivers face and then try to coach our maintenance team to be aware of those issues and give the help and respect they deserve.

In talking to drivers and reading trucking trade magazines, I can gain an insight into what drivers have to deal with every day. At the top of all lists is detention time. You have to wait for the customer to unload you and to add insult to injury, you have to wait for your truck or trailer to be repaired. You are probably sitting there thinking about your mortgage payment or insurance payment and thinking you are not making any money. I can't do much to help with the customer situation, but I feel I can have some impact on downtime for maintenance.

One thing is for certain in trucking, the equipment will breakdown and need repairs and routine maintenance. The problem is we have little control over breakdown repairs, but we can affect the wait time for routine maintenance.  Considering breakdowns, we constantly monitor our breakdown vendors and how responsive they are to our service demands. Included in our monitoring, is consideration for how quick they can respond to driver need on the side of the road and how driver friendly they are. Of course, cost and quality are part of our evaluations too. We are not reluctant to walk away from a vendor should we find they are not respectful of our drivers or if they are not timely in responding to our breakdowns. One of our goals for 2017 is to formalize our grading system for vendors which will ensure we are making the best decision when we select a vendor for your repair.

At our Murray and West Memphis shops, we take your wait time very seriously. We track the time it takes to get your repairs and PM's done from the time you go through the inspection lane until your truck is completed and put back into service. We routinely review these statistics to gain better understanding of how we can shorten that wait time. I am pleased to report that we made some progress in reducing wait time last year and we will continue to work for further reductions at our shops. For us, it is all about respecting your situation and knowing that while you are waiting on us, you are not making money.

We have seen an onslaught of regulations that make it more difficult to do your job over the past few years.  Hours of service, electronic logging devices, CSA and other government initiatives have all cut into the freedoms of being a truck driver. There is little our maintenance group can do about those issues except to be appreciative of what you are dealing with.

I've been told that working for a guy who has never driven a truck makes the job even more frustrating. I can't disagree with that. What I can tell you is that most of us in maintenance have not driven a truck, but we try to have an understanding of some of the issues you face. That is why our response to drivers at our shops is even more important, because here you are home in a sense of the word and we want your experience with maintenance to be the best it can be. We want to show respect and responsiveness to your needs and get you back on the road as quickly as possible.

We recognize drivers are the lifeblood of the company and maintenance is a necessary evil. We recognize that when you encounter a breakdown or have to wait on maintenance, you are probably not going to be having your best day. We understand that and we are pledged to do everything we can to make your experience with maintenance as positive as possible under the circumstances and get you back on the road in a safe vehicle as quickly as possible.

You folks are out there and I am not. If you have feedback or ideas that can improve the maintenance process or the relations between drivers and maintenance, feel free to let me know. I will consider your ideas and make changes where possible.

Thanks for reading. Our entire maintenance team wishes you a safe and maintenance free trip.



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Tuesday, February 21, 2017

PRE and POST-TRIP INSPECTIONS

PRE and POST-TRIP INSPECTIONS

One opportunity drivers have to positively affect CSA scores, theirs and the Company's, is to regularly perform Pre and Post trip inspections. Performing these inspections is more important than it's ever been.

Common DOT Violations and out-of-service items that will be recorded and scored against your CSA Driver profile:

1.    Inoperative lights

2.    Flat tires/measuring less than 80 psi

3.    Brake/air system issues

4.    Tandem pins not engaged

5.    Fire extinguisher, unsecured or discharged

All of the items in the common DOT violation list should be checked during a thorough Pre and Post-trip inspection.

You have a moral, professional, and legal duty to your employer, other motorists, and yourself to conduct a thorough inspection of any rig you drive. The secret to making an efficient and accurate inspection is to learn the step-by-step inspection routine. If you inspect your rig the same way every time, you will be able to do it quickly and efficiently without a chance of overlooking a key system or part. Use the checklist on the following page during your inspection.

While inspecting note any defects on your DVIR on the Qualcomm. In addition, if it is a DOT reportable item then contact the Breakdown department to get this repaired. If you need additional help or training learning how to inspect, see one of our inspectors in Murray or West Memphis.


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Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Our History


 Celebrating 80 years
1937-2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
Paschall Truck Lines, or PTL, as it is commonly known, was started by the late L. W. Paschall and his wife Mary Frank Paschall in 1937. L. W. was the youngest of the three Paschall children. His father died at the early age of 48. That left L. W. and his siblings the responsibility of running the family farm. It was during this period that L. W. observed that farmers and other people needed a way to haul things from place to place.
Mr. Paschall began his operation with a 1936 Ford truck. He hauled sawdust, fertilizer, gravel, cross-ties or anything he could just to make a living. Those early years were tough. The area’s road and bridge system was not well built and often times a bridge would collapse under the weight of a heavy load and they would have to stop and repair the bridge. In later years, the company established a milk route where they picked up fresh milk from the farm and delivered it to Ryan Milk in Murray. They also provided a fleet of trucks that could go out onto the farmer’s fields and spread fertilizer right off the truck.
As the business began to thrive, so did the services offered by Paschall Truck Lines. Over the road authority was tightly regulated in those days, but L. W. managed to secure rights to haul general freight between Louisville, St. Louis, Memphis and Murray which provided significant benefits to the local business community. In addition, the company began to haul granite for tombstone and monuments from Elberton, Georgia back to the local area.
By 1972, L. W. had grown the company to 35 employees and over 100 pieces of equipment. L. W. began to think of retirement and in 1973 sold the company to Randall A. Waller. Mr. Waller was a young investor with trucking experience from Nashville, TN who had begun working in the trucking industry while still in high school. His interest in the industry was so strong that he would often stay after work just to learn another job from a co-worker. This background had prepared him well to direct the future of Paschall Truck Lines, Inc., even at a young age.
Mr. Waller had extensive knowledge of the trucking authority legal process and immediately began to expand the authorities for routes over which the company’s trucks could travel and deliver freight. This expansion of authority increased the service opportunities for western Kentucky businesses and permitted the company to grow at a rapid pace in those early years. Within a few years of the acquisition, Mr. Waller chose to discontinue the flatbed granite operation to focus the company’s full resources on developing the growing less than truckload (LTL) market between western Kentucky and the Louisville, Nashville, Memphis and St. Louis gateway markets. This proved to be a successful market realignment which resulted in accelerated growth in the company’s primary market area.
In 1979, The Tappan Manufacturing Company announced the closure of their Murray plant. Arrangements were made with PTL to assist with equipment relocation to their Mansfield, Ohio operations which began the company’s entry into the truckload market.
Additional authorities were obtained to permit the company to deliver truckload quantity freight throughout the eastern 31 states. At this time in the nation’s transportation history, the securing of this authority was very rare, and the fact that a small carrier located in Murray, Kentucky had this type of authority generated interest from many larger carriers which did not have such authority. 
In 1980, Congress passed the Motor Carrier Act of 1980 which deregulated the control of issuing operating authority. This legislation resulted in the demise of hundreds of major trucking companies throughout the United States. Randall Waller, recognizing that the fundamentals of his business had changed with the passage of the deregulation legislation, began to position the company to move forward in an unexplored deregulated environment. Operations were structured that permitted the company to expand its truckload service, first by offering service in and out of western Kentucky to four states. Within two years, the company was providing truckload service to the 31 easternmost states. By 1986 PTL was offering service throughout the entire 48 states, Canada, and Mexico.
The company continued to offer both its traditional LTL service and the truckload service. Major growth was developing in the truckload sector and the composition of the business was changing. In 1978, 100 percent of the company’s revenue came from the LTL service. By 1986, LTL service represented approximately 20% of the company’s revenue and truckload contributed the balance. Based on these changing trends, Mr. Waller announced the discontinuance of LTL service in the fall of 1986 so the company could focus its full resources on the growth of the truckload sector. This realignment of the company’s operating strategy resulted in an era of significant growth and development.
Mr. Waller knew that he would eventually need a plan to transfer the ownership and management of the business. In 2011 he began examining a number of options to sell his ownership in the company. Most of his options would mean that at some point in the future PTL could leave Murray, KY. Mr. Waller did not want to risk that. On October 29, 2013 he announced he had opted to preserve local ownership and further strengthen Paschall Truck Lines, Inc.’s strong future by selling 100 percent of his stock in the company to its employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (“ESOP”).
Paschall Truck Lines, Inc. currently has facilities in Murray, KY, Franklin, TN, West Memphis, AR, Indianapolis, IN, El Paso, TX, Brownsville, TX and Laredo, TX. Paschall Truck Lines, Inc., has developed an enviable reputation in the trucking industry with over 70 years of performance on America’s roads, and currently ranks 95th among the nation’s largest trucking companies.
 
 
 
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Monday, February 13, 2017

Employee Stock Ownership Plan




Our Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) is your other company retirement benefit. It is not a replacement for your 401(k) account. PTL's ESOP was created to share long-term success among all employees, to maintain our independence and local ownership, to secure the company's future and to provide employees with an additional retirement benefit.

All employees are treated exactly the same with this ESOP. Over the road Drivers participate on the same basis as office, maintenance, and administrative employees. New employees must be at least twenty-one years old and work for PTL for one year (working at least 1,000 hours during that year). Once you meet that criteria, you join the plan on the next January 1 or July 1. Once you enter the ESOP, you'll begin accumulating PTL shares in your ESOP account. After you enter the ESOP you will receive an ESOP statement once a year. (Depending upon your date of hire and due to the structure of the plan, it could be 2 1/2 years after your date of hire that you receive an ESOP statement.) Your ESOP benefit is completely funded by the company. It costs you nothing.

PTL remains a privately held company and is not traded on any public stock market, like the New York Stock Exchange or NASDAQ. You may not purchase additional shares, nor may you sell the shares you hold in your ESOP account.

Our trustee, First Bankers Trust oversees the ESOP plan's operations, acting in employees' best interests as plan participants. They hire a third-party appraiser to determine the value of our stock each year. The appraiser, by law, must be independent and qualified. To determine the annual stock value, the appraiser looks at a number of factors, the most important being PTL's business performance.

As a 100% ESOP Owned S Corporation, the Trust is a tax-exempt entity so when the Company is profitable, those taxes that would typically have to be paid are now tax deferred and can stay in the company to build up cash/investments, reinvest in the business, pay down debt, etc... which all add to value.
There are about 8,000 ESOPs in America. Our ESOP plan provides us with a unique opportunity, one most people don't receive. How well the company does in the future will depend on you. Research studies consistently show that participative ESOP companies perform better than companies that are not employee-owned or participative. If PTL does well, the ESOP stock could be worth quite a lot of money, but no one can predict how much. The company intends to be very successful and as an Employee-Owner there is the potential to share significant wealth. Let's make the most of it.


Date             Share value

12/31/13         $10.40

12/31/14         $30.00

12/31/15         $39.00
 
 
 
 
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Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Who do you call? Q & A

Where do I get transflo/logbooks/comchecks in Murray?  The inspection bay or the training center.

I am O/S for safety paperwork, what do I do?  Contact safety when you are near a fax machine. They will fax the paperwork to you. Fill it out as best as you can and fax it back to them.

Who do I contact for rider pass/pet pass?  Safety Ext. 364, 368 or 726.

How do I go about getting a different truck?  Get your fleet manager to flag you for one of the terminals, either Murray or West Memphis. No need to call us ahead of time. If you are in Murray the truck assignment meeting starts at 12:30 Monday-Friday next to the driver assignments office. On Saturday and Sunday it will be held at 9 am. If you are in West Memphis go see Danny Lane Monday-Friday. On weekends see Greg Furr.

How do I check my miles or my trainees' miles?  Send a message to your fleet manager.

How do I set up direct deposit?  Call Perry Jarvis in Finance at Ext. 312.

When does the pay period end?  The pay period begins every Friday morning at 12:01 a.m. and ends each Thursday at midnight. All the loads you have delivered or t-called by midnight each Thursday night will be paid the following Friday.

How is my vacation figured?  Take all the miles you have been paid for the previous year, divide by 52 weeks, multiply by your rate of pay (East Rate and West rates apply) and that is your vacation pay amount.

How is home time calculated?  For each 6 days out you earn 1 day at home.

Who do I contact if I have a question regarding my miles?   Contact your Fleet Manager if you have questions regarding the amount of miles on a load.

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